repairs to a damaged bladder sphincter muscle. what are the options for repair
Dr Joseph Schoeman
Dr Joseph Schoeman
Urologist
Auchenflower
Sphincteric muscle injury denotes that control of urine is limited, even totally impossible caused by damage to the external urethral sphincter. It can generally present as stress incontinence (leakage with coughing and sneezing or exertion). Pelvic floor rehabilitation and strengthening with a dedicated physiotherapist is an essential first step. If there are complicating factors surrounding this, a Uro dynamic study is indicated to determine the extent of a possible coexisting overactive bladder and to manage that first. Confirmed stress incontinence is managed with a urethral sling of sorts. Almost all the synthetic slings for ladies have been removed from the market, therefore taking us back 20 years to Burch colposuspension or a Fascial sling. Gents still have options of slings or sphincters available. Total incontinence needs to be assessed thoroughly and may possibly already have had multiple procedures. It may result in an artificial sphincter or possibly an urinary diversion if permant catheterisation is not an option for the person. This is just an overview and each affected person may differ resulting in a tailor made approach.

Dr Dinesh Patel
Dr Dinesh Patel
Urologist
Campsie
In a male, an ATOMS device may be a suitable option.

Couldn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask another question!

This value is too short. It should have __LIMIT__ character or more.

  • Your question will be published anonymously.
  • Make it one, clear medical question and be brief.
  • Question will go to all specialists using this site. Not to one specific doctor.
  • This service does not replace a consultation with a healthcare professional. If you have a problem or urgency, go to your doctor or emergency room.
  • Questions about a specific case or second opinion requests are not allowed.

Choose the medical specialisation of the doctors you want to send the question to
We will use it to notify you about the answer. It will not be published online.
All the contents published in Doctoralia.com.au, especially medical question and answers, are informative and in no case must be considered a substitute for medical advice.