Services & pricing

First visit Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


First visit Cosmetic Surgery


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


Laser surgery


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


Liposuction


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


Sclerotherapy


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


Skin biopsy


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine


330 Oxford St, Paddington

Peach Cosmetic Medicine

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Questions solved

%{Count} solved patients' doubts in Doctoralia


  • Question about Sclerotherapy

    Have you had patients having Sclerotherapy complain of heaviness in chest feeling unwell pounding pulse and elevated BP lasting afew days after treatment?

    If this is you, then the fact that you know the pulse was pounding and that your BP was elevated suggests you've already had some sort of medical assessment. The provisional diagnosis is pulmonary embolism and you need to urgently attend your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.
    If this is a more theoretical question, not pertaining to any current patient, then, like the others, I can say that no, I have never had a patient describe such symptoms after a treatment at my practice.

    Nonetheless, it *is* a possibility - a risk of around 0.1% after ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy to greater saphenous vein.

    Dr. John Mahony

  • Question about Varicose veins

    Can you give me information on laser removal of varicose veins?

    If you are referring to thick blue snake-like veins running up and down the inner aspect of your thigh, then Dr Garbowski is correct - these are likely to be true varicose veins and the approaches he has advocated are correct (although ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy is another option with its advocates, including vascular surgeons).
    Some patients use the term "varicose veins" to describe finer blue veins elsewhere on the legs - these are more properly called venulectasiae, and they are generally best treated by sclerotherapy, although ambulatory phlebectomy is an option. These approaches are generally superior to laser treatments for such vessels.

    Not sure whether you can post some photos on this website, but, failing this, you should send photos of your veins to some or all of us for further advice prior to making an appointment.

    Dr. John Mahony

All the contents published in Doctoralia.com.au, especially medical question and answers, are informative and in no case must be considered a substitute for medical advice.