Ian Skinner

Ian Skinner

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Specialist in: Hip and knee surgery

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Reviews of Ian Skinner

5

Based on 1 review

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Review

"I was told I needed both hips replaced. went to dr Skinner for 2nd opinion. He is awesome I live 7hours from perth and he took time to investigate hip problems had 2 joint injections, all arranged while I was in perth. I don't need hip replacements!!!
He is friendly and listens and is very thorough."

Patient who saw Ian Skinner

Experience

Training

  • MBBS
  • FRACS (Orthopaedic Surgery)
  • MBBSUniversity of Western Australia1986
  • FRACSRoyal Australasian College of Surgeons1998
  • FAOAAustralian Orthopaedic Association2001

Expertise in

Languages

  • English

Services

  • First visit Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Subsequent visits Orthopaedic Surgery
  • ACL reconstruction
  • Arthroscopy
  • Bone fracture repair
  • Bone graft
  • Bunion removal
  • Bunionectomy
  • Carpal tunnel release
  • Cartilage regeneration - knee
  • Hallux valgus correction
  • Hip arthroplasty
  • Hip hemiarthroplasty
  • Hip joint replacement
  • Joint fluid aspiration
  • Knee arthroplasty
  • Knee arthroscopy
  • Knee joint replacement
  • Knee microfracture surgery
  • Knee scope - arthroscopic lateral retinacular release
  • Partial knee replacement
  • Patellar debridement
  • Synovectomy
  • Tendon repair
  • Total hip replacement
  • Total knee replacement
  • UKA
  • Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty
  • Unicondylar knee replacement

Ian Skinner's Answers

3 Answers

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Ian Skinner is answering questions that patients ask on Doctoralia.
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ACL reconstruction is the replacement of the torn and non functioning anterior cruciate ligament with a substitute. The substitute can be a hamstring tendon (or 2), a piece of quadriceps tendon or part of the patella tendon (usually from the same leg). Sometimes graft is from a donor or is of artificial material. The best results are achieved by a surgeon with significant experience and a well motivated patient carefully following the rehabilitation program.
The younger and more active are most likely to benefit from reconstruction. Other injuries such as a meniscal (cartilage) tear can be addressed at the same time as the ACL surgery. It is often possible to repair a meniscal tear at the same time.
Older active patients can also benefit, if the rest of the knee is in relatively good condition.
It is best to talk to your orthopaedic surgeon regarding your particular case to see if ACL reconstruction is right for you.

Ian Skinner

Ian Skinner

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Orthopaedic Surgeon

Palmyra

Flight should be discussed with your surgeon. Generally speaking, flight following a knee replacement should be considered only if necessary for the first 6 weeks. Rural patients can fly home much sooner IF appropriate precautions are observed. Factors such as comfort (aircraft seats are very close and a good knee bend is required), access on and off the aircraft (can you get up and down the stairs or is there an air-bridge) need consideration. DVT is a significant concern. If you need to fly, use an anti coagulant (blood thinner), keep mobile -> move around the aircraft, drink more water than usual-> the dry air will dehydrate you, consider compression stockings - but wear them properly - don't let them roll and bunch -> this can make matters worse. Remember that the first 6 weeks are the most important for determining your final outcome, so staying close to home and attending to your physiotherapy program cannot be over estimated (and close to your surgeon if things need some help!

Ian Skinner

Ian Skinner

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Orthopaedic Surgeon

Palmyra

Undergoing arthroscopy to both knees at the same time can be a good idea IF there is an independant need for each knee to be treated arthroscopically, your general health is good and you have good supports at home for a few days. Undergoing surgery to both knees at the same time should reduce greatly the time total needed away from work (compared to have each knee treated separately, with a period of recovery between).
Patients undergoing arthroscopy of one knee usually are treated and able to be discharged home the same day. If both knees are treated on the same day, it generally best to stay in hospital overnight and be reviewed by a physiotherapist before going home the following morning. This makes sure that there are no problems and you are able to walk and are comfortable.

Ian Skinner

Ian Skinner

Premium Profile Has a more complete profile

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Palmyra

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