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OA stands for Osteoarthritis. It is the general type of arthritis that people refer to when talking about joint degeneration. It describes the loss of cartilage that occurs due to multiple reasons. When you have an "Inflammatory Arthropathy" this is one where there is abnormal inflammation in a joint, the results in damage to the joint. This includes conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, SLE, and Psoriatic Arthritis. These are managed by treating the inflammation first. Often these medications are required lifelong, but great advances have led to people living normal lives, without developing severe joint disturbances. Once you have arthritis in a joint, such as your Hip or Knee, and there is full loss of cartilage, surgery can be considered. This includes Total Hip Replacements, Total Knee Replacements or Fusions (Moreso for smaller joints). CRP of 13 is mildly elevated, but can be for many reasons. A Rheumatologist would be most helpful here. I hope this helps you.

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Dr. Chien-Wen Liew Premium Profile Has a more complete profile

Orthopaedic Surgeon, Surgeon

Toorak Gardens

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Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory arthritis, predominantly of the spine, but can also involve peripheral joints. It tends to be persistent (chronic). If untreated it often causes severe pain and joint stiffness, particularly with inactivity and especially overnight and in the morning. Over years, the spine may become gradually fused and spinal movement may be dramatically restricted leading to considerable disability. Fortunately there is some excellent treatments known as biologic agents. These remain expensive and are not readily available throughout the world. Other treatments that also help include range of movement exercises and anti-inflammatory tablets. Sometimes methotrexate and sulphasalazine are also used, especially for peripheral joint involvement.

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Dr. Lynden Roberts

Rheumatologist

Brighton

Sulfasalazine, Enbrel and Arava are all good treatment options for JIA in adults, as is methotrexate and other biologics. On average, they all have good 'efficacy to risk' profiles. Which one will be best for your daughter is a decision best made together with a rheumatologist. Enbrel and other biologics are available in Australia for the more severe forms of this condition.

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Dr. Lynden Roberts

Rheumatologist

Brighton

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